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There was a lot of discussion in the media this past week about the world of football when PBS’s aired the chilling report, “A League of Denial:  The NFL’s Concussion Crisis”.  http://to.pbs.org/1c8cP3W One of the questions that were raised in this focus on the NFL was, “Is football destroying the brains of its players?”  It also raises the question for me, what about the brains of college players, high school players and the 10 year old players?

As a neurofeedback practitioner, I have worked with clients who have complaints of anxiety, depression, attention/focus, addiction disorders and migraines.  Often these are disorders that can result from head injury.  The effect of head injury can be traced to repeated hits to the head which occur at all levels of football—professional football, college football, high school football and youth football leagues.

Neurofeedback can work to retrain damaged parts of the brain.  Focus can be regained, anxiety diminished, depression decreased, addictions conquered and migraines eliminated.

Contact Pamela Key, Neurofeedback Practitioner at Counseling Associates for Well-Being for a free consult to find out how neurofeedback may help you maintain or regain a healthy brain—a healthy life.

 

 

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I am excited to announce that I have completed my 200 hour training as a Certified Hatha Yoga instructor. I am passionate about combining yoga skills and techniques (no mat or flexibility required) with traditional talk therapy to enhance healing from grief, trauma, anxiety, and depression. In addition to the scientifically verified benefits for anxiety and depression, yoga and mindfulness also increase our ability to be present in relationships and in our daily lives, increasing our quality of life. Call me at 706-425-8900 or email me at Suzanne@ca4wellbeing.com to schedule an individual or group session today.

A communication approach that many couples engage in when experiencing conflict is what I like to call “Lawyers in a Courtroom.”  One person presents her case, complete with a list of the partner’s transgressions to prove that she is right and her partner is wrong.  The partner, in turn, compiles his rebuttals and responds with a ledger of her wrongdoings.  There is typically a great deal of verbal volleying with very little listening.  By the end, both parties feel hurt and angry and even more entrenched in original viewpoints.

This approach might work if there is a judge or a jury who ultimately decides who “wins” and each party never has to see each other again.  The thing about committed relationships is, you still have to live with your partner.  Or at least continue to interact with them.  So even if you are able to prove to your partner that she is “wrong” and you are “right,” how loved do you think she feels?  How respected?  How understood?  If she is left feeling devalued and resentful, what have you really won?

The good news is there are some simple changes a couple can make in the way they handle disagreements.  By handling them in a different way, conflicts can go from being painful and alienating to facilitating closeness and intimacy.

The husband of one of my couple-clients said at the end of our work together, “I didn’t want to start marriage therapy because I thought I would have to change who I was as a person.  What I found was that you gave us tools that changed our whole relationship for the better.”

If you are interested in learning a new way of handling disagreements with your partner, please contact me to schedule a couples counseling session at 706-425-8900 ext 709 or s.rains@ca4wellbeing.com.

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This amazing new technology has proven effective for treatment of anxiety, depression, ADHD, fibromyalgia, migraines and a host of other disorders.  How does this happen?

We start with completing a brainmap that consists of applying EEG sensors to the head and measuring the brainwave frequencies.  It is there where we find the inefficiencies in the brain such as the brain operating too fast where anxiety is often present or the brain operating too slow which is common with depression.  The brain map will provide a guide to show what brainwave frequencies need to be trained up or down to normalize the brainwave activity.

Once the brainmap is obtained, brainwave training will begin.  This is a form of operant conditioning—-establishing a new, more efficient and effective neural pathway.  This is done with the client listening to music or watching a video.  When the brainwave moves into the desired new zone, an auditory or visual reward is given.  The brain “likes” these rewards and the new pathway is encouraged to stay in this new pattern.  Repeated training conditions the neural pathway to become the new norm.  Once this happens, symptoms of disorders begin to be reduced and eventually can become significantly reduced or eliminated.

For more information, contact our Neurofeedback Practitioner, Pamela Key for complimentary consult.  Pamela@ca4wellbeing.com or (706) 425-8900 Ext. 702

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Adding yoga as a complement to therapy for depression, anxiety, grief, and trauma can prove more powerful than talk therapy alone.  “Ancient yogic practices are now evidence-based strategies for mood management”, writes Amy Weintraub, author of “Yoga Skills for Therapists”. One does not have to be flexible or able and willing to get on a mat and practice the physical poses called “asana”.  Powerful breathing practices called “pranayama” as well as guided meditation and other skills are adequate for gaining the benefits of calming the nervous system and elevating or calming the mood.

I have observed these benefits as a professional, but I also know the research rings true for me personally.  Yoga was instrumental in my own healing after suddenly losing a spouse 11 years ago. Over a decade later, yoga remains an integral part of my self-care. Currently, I am completing a 200 hour yoga teacher training to continue bringing these powerful practices to my clients.  I am especially excited to announce my “Healing From Loss through Mind/Body Awareness” therapy group. This group will utilize yoga skills as well as group processing to heal from painful losses. I have specialized for many years in helping those who are grieving (in groups and individually) and am thrilled to offer this special opportunity.  Please contact me at 706-425-8900 or email me at Suzanne@ca4wellbeing to learn more.

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Yoga skills can enhance healing from grief and trauma by increasing body awareness, improving emotion regulation and self-soothing, and by strengthening the connection to the self. When our mind and body are shaken by the loss of a loved one or a traumatic event, our nervous system may go haywire for a time.

Breathwork and other yoga skills can be powerful aids to grief therapy work as well as for anxiety and depression. In her book, Eastern Body, Western Mind, Anodea Judith describes, “It is important to remember that the point of grief work is to regain connection with the self inside rather than increase our attachment to what was lost.” In other words, we do not dig into grief just for the sake of it, but we purposefully learn about our emotions and how to work with them as a means to feel connected to ourselves again and to be more present in our lives.

For more information about individual and group therapy opportunities that incorporate the use of yoga skills, please contact Suzanne McLean at 706-425-8900 or email at suzanne@ca4wellbeing.com.