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Life based on gratitude, optimism and meaning is presented in this video: http://www.learning2connect.com/node/2074

Under dire circumstances, Alice Herz Sommer kept her focus “where it is good”, knowing that both “bad and good” are simultaneously on-going, and yet consciously choosing to keep her focus toward the good; in that place, everything is a present. And when you see and hear her laugh, you know this is genuine.

From birth she was optimistic and she wanted to have fun ; almost like she’s received the optimist gene at birth and passed it on to her son as well!!

Her love of music seems to be an intrisic part of her life and her love for life. At the time of her life when she and her son were in concentration camps, music, in theses circumstances, was not an entertainment;  “music was a much bigger value: it gave people moral support… The music gave us undescribable beauty”, may be satisfying the need for Inspiration or Meaning, like Viktor Frankl proposes in his book “Man’s Search For Meaning”.

I so enjoy her simple determination and clarity about her focus in life. It appears that she has practiced theses for ever, and I cannot help but believe this comes from the way she was raised, from parents who mirrored her with joy. I’d love to get your feedback about how this touches you. And contact me if you feel inspired and want to explore this further, at: aline@ca4wellbeing.com, or 706 425 8900, ext 705.

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Summertime has always been a time for a change of pace.  Going on vacation, reading a few good books, spending time with grandparents and summer camps.  This summer, during the break of the normal routine, consider neurofeedback training as an option to change your brain and improve your life.

What can neurofeedback provide?  ŸIncreased focus and attention…… Ÿ Reduced stress and anxiety….. ŸBetter sleep….. ŸLetting go of destructive repetitive thoughts and actions….. ŸGaining a competitive edge in academics through peak performance training.

Studies have shown that students lose a portion of what they have learned over the summer school break.  Neurofeedback can keep the brain active, develop new patterns for learning and allow for improved brain functioning.  It’s the perfect time to train your brain and make it a summer of positive change!

Join Pamela Key for an information session on Neurofeedback on Tuesday, May 20th at 6:30 p.m. at Counseling Associates for Well-Being.   Let us know you will attend.  RSVP:  Pamela@ca4wellbeing.com or contact her for more information.

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Are you or do you know someone who is struggling with attention and focus in the classroom or in life in general?  Is medication the only treatment that you are aware of being offered to help?  If so, check out Neurofeedback as an effective ADHD treatment.

Neurofeedback is a safe, non-invasive alternative option for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).  It teaches the brain to stay attentive and focused through self-regulation.  It retrains the inefficient neural pathways into efficient neural pathways that more easily attend and focus to tasks.  Neurofeedback has now been accepted by the American Academy of Pediatrics as a Level 1 “Best Support” intervention for ADHD.  Compelling published research supports its effectiveness.

The efficacy of neurofeedback has been documented in over fifty peer-reviewed, published journal articles.  These research studies show that the effectiveness of neurofeedback is equal to or greater than any other therapeutic intervention for ADHD.  In addition, the positive effects of NFB are maintained, and in some cases, even increase once the treatment ends.  In contrast, the benefits of stimulant medication stop as soon as the medication is discontinued, and over 50% of the individuals taking a stimulant medication are reported to have one or more significant adverse side effects (e.g., poor appetite, irritability, stunted growth, and sleep problems).  It is no surprise that individuals and parents of children with ADHD are fearful of using stimulant medications on a long-term basis and often seek a non-drug alternative.

For more information about neurofeedback and how it may help with attention/focus issues; please contact Pamela Key, Neurofeedback Practitioner at Counseling Associates for Well-Being.  (706) 425-8600 or pamela@ca4wellbeing.com

Something that really spoke to me at the time that I was just beginning the step-parent/ blended family journey was the notion that almost every step-family came into existence after a significant loss.  Some come after a death, and some after a divorce.  And it made so much sense to me that a big factor in how the journey of the step-family evolved was how that loss had impacted everyone in the family.  And of course, where each person was in their journey with the grief around that loss.

As I work with people in newly blended families, I often see struggles coming from unresolved anger and hurt with an ex, or fear and uncertainty about creating a new vision for the future after the loss of another vision.  When people divorce, there is this profound sense of loss—not necessarily of the marriage as it actually was, but of the marriage that was at one time hoped for.

Children of the divorce are affected by changes. What they have come to know as “how things are and how things work” is no longer the same.    Often their parents’ discord was troublesome before the divorce. The changes that come after their parents split , even though they may hold the potential for something better,  is scary because it is unknown—and so much is just different.  What is lost is simply the predictability that life once had.   So the union of a new couple in aftermath of such a loss brings even more change, even more uncertainty.

Certainly, the length of time since a death or divorce has happened can impact the ease of the transition, but if a divorce or death was truly difficult or traumatic, the impact on the expectations and fears around that can be seen even years later.    Understanding and processing the losses can help enormously with the journey to a great step-coupling and blended family life.

If you need some help in your step-family journey, contact Claire Zimmerman, LCSW at Claire@ca4wellbeing.com

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There was a lot of discussion in the media this past week about the world of football when PBS’s aired the chilling report, “A League of Denial:  The NFL’s Concussion Crisis”.  http://to.pbs.org/1c8cP3W One of the questions that were raised in this focus on the NFL was, “Is football destroying the brains of its players?”  It also raises the question for me, what about the brains of college players, high school players and the 10 year old players?

As a neurofeedback practitioner, I have worked with clients who have complaints of anxiety, depression, attention/focus, addiction disorders and migraines.  Often these are disorders that can result from head injury.  The effect of head injury can be traced to repeated hits to the head which occur at all levels of football—professional football, college football, high school football and youth football leagues.

Neurofeedback can work to retrain damaged parts of the brain.  Focus can be regained, anxiety diminished, depression decreased, addictions conquered and migraines eliminated.

Contact Pamela Key, Neurofeedback Practitioner at Counseling Associates for Well-Being for a free consult to find out how neurofeedback may help you maintain or regain a healthy brain—a healthy life.

 

 

I quite often use Nonviolent Communication in my work as a counselor as it has been for me a way to become more compassionate with myself and others. I would like to share this link with you: http://www.nonviolentcommunication.com/freeresources/article_archive/heartofnvc_mrosenberg  It introduces the concepts of this approach, which focuses on staying connected instead of expecting a specific outcome.

I have been studying NVC / compassionate communication for more than 10 years, and I keep opening doors in myself as well as being able to listen to others in a way that they can “be seen asbeautiful”. There is a deep harmonious connection that develops through this approach as we grow more aware of our feelings and needs and take responsibility for them. I am not feeling angry because “you” (whatever you did or did not do)… any more; I feel angry because of that need for connection that is so essential and precious to me, and that has not been addressed lately in our relationship.

I enjoy sharing this approach as it does create more space and more possibilities in our lives. If you are interested in learning more about it, feel free to contact me at 706 425 8900 ext 705, or at Aline@ca4wellbeing.com.

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